Resources

Research topics,
Latest news and updates

RESOURCES

Remote monitoring of iPSC-derived neural crest cells

Neuronal cells used in in vitro research are often derived via directed differentiation of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In order to make sure the iPSCs differentiate into neuronal cells, it is very important to keep a close eye on your cells during this costly 30-day process. CytoSMART’s live-cell imaging microscopes and Anatomic's 7-day neural differentiation method can speed up this process.

Learn more
News image

RESOURCES

Modes of Cell Migration

Cell migration is an essential process involved in important physiological processes such as embryogenesis, angiogenesis, wound healing and the immune response. Cells migrate in different modes depending on the type and function of the cells. Leukocytes, for example, migrate the majority of their life span as single cells within virtually any tissue in the body. Many other cell types only move at specific situations to place, shape or repair tissue. Most of these cells move in groups that are loosely or closely associated. This type of migration is called collective cell migration. In this article, different modes of both single cell migration and collective cell migration are discussed.

Learn more
News image

RESOURCES

Wound healing assay - what, why and how

The wound-healing assay is a convenient and economical method to investigate collective cell migration under different experimental conditions. As collective cell migration is linked to many physiological and pathological processes related to embryogenesis, wound repair and cancer metastasis, the wound healing assay is broadly applicable. We discuss how to set up an experiment and several options to analyze imaging data.

Learn more
News image

RESOURCES

CytoSMART cloud security

CytoSMART devices are connected to the Microsoft Azure cloud environment. In this article, we discuss cloud safety, privacy, and international compliance.

Learn more
News image

RESOURCES

Clonogenic (colony formation) assay for stem cells

Although colony formation assays are more widely known as a cancer biology assay, they do have applications in the field of stem cell biology where the self renewal potential of stem cells and their progenitors is assessed. Colony forming assays that are used in this context are not end-point based and rely on live cell imaging. The assay enables selection of desired colonies for further culturing and experimentation. Assessing colony formation is most commonly used for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), in the form of a colony formation unit (CFU) assay.

Learn more
News image
Sign up now

Want to stay up to date? Sign up for our newsletter

No, thanks